Writing an abstract for a journal article

Thus, for the vast majority of readers, the paper does not exist beyond its abstract. Some journals include additional sections, such as Objectives between Background and Methods and Limitations at the end of the abstract.

Specifically, most good computer architecture papers conclude that something is so many percent faster, cheaper, smaller, or otherwise better than something else. This is because readers who peruse an abstract do so to learn about the findings of the study.

If a title interests them, they glance through the abstract of that paper.

In the rest of this paper, issues related to the contents of each section will be examined in turn. Examples of acceptably written abstracts are presented in Table 6 ; one of these has been modified from an actual publication.

Conclusion Writing an efficient abstract is hard work, but will repay you with increased impact on the world by enticing people to read your publications. Other Considerations An abstract must be a fully self-contained, capsule description of the paper.

These have two purposes. Any major restrictions or limitations on the results should be stated, if only by using "weasel-words" such as "might", "could", "may", and "seem". A wide variety of acceptably composed backgrounds is provided in Table 2 ; most of these have been adapted from actual papers.

How to write a good abstract for a scientific paper or conference presentation

Introduction Now that the use of on-line publication databases is prevalent, writing a really good abstract has become even more important than it was a decade ago. Background This section should be the shortest part of the abstract and should very briefly outline the following information: Are your results general, potentially generalizable, or specific to a particular case?

The usual sections defined in a structured abstract are the Background, Methods, Results, and Conclusions; other headings with similar meanings may be used eg, Introduction in place of Background or Findings in place of Results.

Finally, most readers will acknowledge, with a chuckle, that when they leaf through the hard copy of a journal, they look at only the titles of the contained papers.

Chapter 6 discusses abstracts. Table 4 Open in a separate window Results The results section is the most important part of the abstract and nothing should compromise its range and quality.

Writers should follow a checklist consisting of: If your abstract runs too long, either it will be rejected or someone will take a chainsaw to it to get it down to size. Following this checklist should increase the chance of people taking the time to obtain and read your complete paper. But now, instead of merely convincing the reader to keep reading the rest of the attached paper, an abstract must convince the reader to leave the comfort of an office and go hunt down a copy of the article from a library or worse, obtain one after a long wait through inter-library loan.

What is already known about the subject, related to the paper in question What is not known about the subject and hence what the study intended to examine or what the paper seeks to present In most cases, the background can be framed in just 2—3 sentences, with each sentence describing a different aspect of the information referred to above; sometimes, even a single sentence may suffice.

What was the extent of your work did you look at one application program or a hundred programs in twenty different programming languages? How did you go about solving or making progress on the problem?

What are the implications of your answer? However, they are also used to assign papers to review committees or editors, which can be extremely important to your fate.

Embedded system designers may be interested in my blog. Did you use simulation, analytic models, prototype construction, or analysis of field data for an actual product? Is it going to change the world unlikelybe a significant "win", be a nice hack, or simply serve as a road sign indicating that this path is a waste of time all of the previous results are useful.

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Avoid vague, hand-waving results such as "very", "small", or "significant.Sep 10,  · Expert Reviewed. How to Write an Abstract. Three Parts: Getting Your Abstract Started Writing Your Abstract Formatting Your Abstract Community Q&A If you need to write an abstract for an academic or scientific paper, don't panic!

Your abstract is simply a short, stand-alone summary of the work or paper that others can use as an 82%(). Almost everyone knows what an abstract is: a short synopsis that precedes the text of the journal article.

How to Write an Abstract

Fewer people fully realize the power of this little summary. An abstract is brief summary of a research article that emphasizes what is new, captures the salient features of the purpose, design, findings, and implications, and contains no unnecessary sentences or explanations.

A good abstract includes. If you want to find out more about writing a critique or a review of a work, see the UNC Writing Center handout on writing a literature review.

If you are unsure which type of abstract you should write, ask your instructor (if the abstract is for a class) or read other abstracts in your field or in the journal where you are submitting your article. How to Write an Abstract. Philip Koopman, Carnegie Mellon University This article describes how to write a good computer architecture abstract for both conference and journal papers.

Writers should follow a checklist consisting of: motivation, problem statement, approach, results, and conclusions. Writing an efficient abstract is hard.

Some (like Benjamin Herman’s history abstract and Diana Dewi and Jennifer Kittleson’s apparel and textile design abstract) include nearly final results, while others (like Laura Silberman’s curriculum & instruction abstract) Visual and Performing Arts Abstracts.

Download
Writing an abstract for a journal article
Rated 5/5 based on 2 review